Why EPL Teams Joins FA Cup in January

The FA Cup is the widest soccer competition in England since it involves teams from league 1 to league 10. This tournament gives the “small” teams a chance to compete with the Premier League “giants.”  The competition is also the oldest. The first tournament was played 147 years ago in the 1871-1872 season.

The tournament is currently ongoing. However, EPL teams will not be in the fixtures until January. This is because FA is structured in such a way that different football levels join the tournament in different months from August to January of the following year.

League 10 to league 5 teams join the competition at the qualification stage between August and October annually. Whereas, league 6 to league 1 teams join the competition between November and January.

English Premier League (League 1) and Championship (League 2) join the tournament in the third round of the Competition Proper stage in January. You can get more details by clicking FA Cup Stages and Rounds.

The mode of competition is knockout matches played on the home ground of either team without a return match. Many fans perceive this mode unfair given the home-advantage factor.

After each round, FA makes a draw that determines the venue and dates for the next matches including new entrants in the Cup. The same procedure is repeated until the semifinals draw whose winners play finals at Wembley national stadium in May.

The FA Cup winner secures a chance in Europa League as explained in which teams qualify for Europa League in English Premier League.

Arsenal is the most successful club with 13 wins closely followed by Manchester United at 12 trophies. Arsenal won the last FA finals in 2017 after scoring twice against Chelsea’s single goal in the finals.

Chelsea is the current FA Cup champions after beating Manchester United by a single goal in a heated final in May 2018.

Now you know. Wait for your favorite EPL team in FA knockouts from January.

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